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"This picture was taken in Japan, somewhere on the long way from Tokyo to Inzai City, a quiet suburban 'bedroom community' approximately sixty kilometers away from the megacity. I was about to leave Tokyo, where I had been living for half a year, and had to get my stepmother's bike, borrowed for the duration of my stay, back to her place in Inzai. So I hopped on the bike, and on I cycled along the Kioroshi-kaido to Inzai. The ride is not picturesque, nor very pleasant (crowded roads, car fumes and nervous drivers make for a rather disharmonious mix), but it is exquisite in its ordinariness: suburbia pretty much all over, between McDonalds and shokudos, apartment complexes and malls, railways and stations, 7-Elevens every five kilometer, although it does get less busy the further you get from Tokyo, with the occasional cherry tree, rice field and green grove. This picture can be several things, depending on how you look at it. Vibrant green, dense vegetation and innumerable power lines - for me, it's very Japanese. Power lines are rarely buried in Japan. I have countless pictures of them, across cities, suburbs, the countryside, mountains even, why not, and I cannot determine whether my love of them stems from their unconscious association to Japan or from the deliciously messy and lively aspect that they confer to any sidewalk, square or crossroads. In this picture it's a bit different though, isn't it? Suburbia in times of worldwide urbanisation: spaces of connections and flows. Are they lived in? Geometrical lines and massive pillars closing in on the sky like prison bars, above a sea of trees, above that tiny speck of a man, as so many stark reminders of what lies behind our light switches. A disfiguration of landscape, some would say, by our rampant energy needs, what a shame; others would argue that this is the modern sublime."

- Zoé

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